Thanks to All at Our 10th Annual Golf Tournament!

On Monday, September 21st we held our tenth annual golf tournament, and it was the best one yet! We had the generous support of 20 sponsors, 71 golfers, and more than 50 donors of auction, prize, and snack items. With their help, we raised over $17,000 to support the Museum & Theatre’s interactive exhibits, educational programming, theatre productions and general operations!

Hunter Panels has sponsored our golf tournament for 10 years!

Hunter Panels has sponsored our golf tournament for 10 years!

 

 

 

We’d like to give a special thank you to our Platinum Event Sponsor, Hunter Panels, who have sponsored our golf tournament every single year. Thanks again for all of your support!

 

 

 

 

The red-tailed hawk spotted during the tournament.

The red-tailed hawk spotted during the tournament.

 

 

 

The event was held over at Nonesuch River Golf Club in Scarborough, Maine, where the weather was perfect for a day on the course. Their beautiful facility is a great spot to get away, full of lovely views, and lots of wildlife. Some golfers were even lucky enough to spot a red-tailed hawk near Holes 4 and 5!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 10th Annual Golf Tournament winners!

The 10th Annual Golf Tournament winners!

The competition was fierce this year, with the winners decided by their tie-breaking performance on Hole 3. This year’s winners were:

1st Place: Drew Gilman, Mike Wilson, Chris Lynch, and Jeff Berman, the team from Cragmoor Capital.

2nd Place: Jim Whitton, Mark Pietras, Phil Kent, and Mark Murphy, one of the teams from Hunter Panels.

3rd Place: Bill Becker, Matt Stringer, and Todd Zukowski, the team from Key Bank. Congratulations to all our winners!

 

 

 

 

Matt Dana making the 30ft putt that qualified him as our sole finalist!

Matt Dana making the 30ft putt that qualified him as our sole finalist!

 

Matt Dana was the finalist in our putting contest, and Evan Lank was the winner of the closest-to-pin contest. Thanks again to all of our golfers! We hope to see you again at next year’s tournament.

 

 

 

 

For the full album of photos from this year’s event, please visit our facebook page.

What’s Happening, Honey Bees?

If you make your way to the second floor of the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine, you’ll find a one of our most dynamic exhibits: our real, live, honeybee hive! With glass walls and a special entrance & exit to the outside world just for bees, it’s easy to spend hours just watching as the bees go about their busy day.

 

Recently, you may have seen a crowd of honey bees gathering around their special entrance. There are two reasons they might do this.

 

Our intern Tym holding up a piece of honeycomb.

Our intern Tym holding up a piece of honeycomb.

The first is called “bearding”, because the cluster of bees on the outside makes it look like their hive has a beard! Bees do this to try          and lower the temperature inside their hive. They even flap their wings to act like fans!

 

The second reason bees gather outside their hive is because they’re preparing to “swarm”. When the hive gets cramped, the queen      bee lays some eggs that will grow into other queens. Because each hive can only have one queen, the old queen takes about half of            the worker bees and flies away to find a new place to live, leaving her daughter as the new queen bee.

 

The group of bees that leaves is called a swarm. The new swarm gathers on the outside of the hive, making a giant mass of bees! No  need to worry about getting stung; to make sure they don’t get hungry on the journey, swarming bees eat lots of honey. Their full  bellies make them so happy, they rarely, if ever, sting during this process!

The beekeeper looking for the queen bee, to make sure she stays with us!

The beekeeper looking for the queen bee, to make sure she stays with us!

 

Twice this year, our bees have started to swarm. We had a lot of days where our window was covered in thousands of bees!

To make sure they found a good home, we took them to the Audobon Society, where our beekeeper split the hive in half. She took a new queen and some bees to a new home and we got the other half back with our current queen.

The second time this happened was last week. Now our hive has lots of space for new bees! Even with so many fewer bees to hide amongst, our queen bee is really hard to spot. If you see her, let us know!

 

Next time you’re at the Museum & Theatre, make sure to stop by the hive on the second floor! We’re sure you’ll agree it’s the bees’ knees.