Show and Tell Gallery Displays Art Across the Autism Spectrum

The Show and Tell Gallery features the work young Maine artists diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Why are we showing this work? Because for a group that sometimes has trouble with connection and expression, it is significant when they are able to express some of their inner world. We believe art is a powerful way to communicate, and we are honored to be displaying these pieces. We celebrate this gift of expression.
 
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention released a sobering report stating that roughly 1 in 55 students in the U.S. has an autism spectrum disorder. Autism and spectrum disorders (Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified [PDD-NOS]) are among the fastest-growing developmental disabilities in the U.S.
 
“For those without much knowledge of autism spectrum disorders, let me provide you with a brief description: people with ASD may have trouble with social communication. Some may not be able to talk. Some may be able to talk, but we will miss the social cues in what you are saying, miss cues about physical space, pacing of words, tone of voice, and other elements of non-verbal language. This will make it difficult for us to have friends, and can cause feelings of loneliness and isolation. Often, people on the autism spectrum have intense interests that they focus on to the exclusion of all else. The world can often be a very overwhelming place, and this helps us structure it. Sensory integration challenges, such as being super sensitive to sounds, touch, light, movement, smells, texture and so on are also part of autism spectrum disorders. But there is also a sense of loyalty, of joy, of honesty and dependability that are all great aspects of those on the autism spectrum. Someone with autism is someone who is dependable and a hard worker. Someone who genuinely cares about you with all their hearts, even if they sometimes have trouble showing it. To be known by someone on the autism spectrum is to be loved more fully and less conditionally than you perhaps have ever experienced.” – Museum volunteer Kate Goldfield
 
The Show and Tell Gallery is one of several Museum & Theatre programs serving children and families affected by ASD. To learn about our Play Our Way private playtimes, workshops, and other program offerings, please contact Louisa Donelson.
The Show and Tell Gallery can be seen in the stairwell of the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine.
 
This project is made possible by the generosity of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Maine. 
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